WildSpot Sightings

Red-billed hornbill seen in Manyeleti Game ReserveWarthog seen in Hluhluwe-Umfolozi Park
Lion seen in Sabi Sands Game Reserve
Rhino seen in Addo National Park
Hippo seen at Lake St Lucia
Waterbuck seen in the Okavango Delta

Kenya

Kenya

Kenya is the country many people automatically associate with African safaris - the alluring landscapes, teeming wildlife and its people have been immortalized and romanticized in movies and books ever since the first Europeans set foot there. Kenya prides itself on a rich conservation history and wildlife reserves which often work directly to benefit the surrounding communities.

In 1995 the Craig family turned their entire farm on the northern slopes of Mt Kenya into the Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, with a mandate to protect and conserve the wildlife of Kenya. They had to convince the local communities to stop seeing animals as competition for their cattle's grazing and instead see them as a source of income. This was achieved and many fences were taken down and old migration routes were re-opened to the animals.

The Masai Mara is one of the best known and most popular reserves in the whole of Africa. At times and in certain places it can get a little overrun with tourist minibuses, but there is something so special about it that it tempts you back time and again.

In the centre of Kenya only 10 miles south of the equator is a snow-capped mountain. This seems so unlikely that the German missionary to report this in 1833 was laughed at. Its existence was not acknowledged for another sixteen years and it then took a further fifty years before anyone climbed to the 16,900 feet (5,199 meter) summit.

Africa's Great Rift Valley is a fault in the earth's crust for over 3,500 miles (5,600km) and contains numerous lakes both large and small.

When you see a camel train walking single file along a dry riverbed, you realise you are in a pretty parched area. The three National Reserves of Samburu, Buffalo Springs and Shaba are at the beginning of the dry north where camels become commonplace.

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